How are the people who fled to us from Ukraine?

Current examples and figures from the city and region of Aschaffenburg

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More on the topic: Ukraine war

Arrival: A mother with her child from Ukraine on her way to Erbighalle in Aschaffenburg-Schweinheim. Photo: Bjorn Friedrich

Photo: Bjorn Friedrich

About 120 refugees from Ukraine are currently accommodated in Aschaffenburg-Irpigal. Photos: Bjorn Friedrich

Photo: Bjorn Friedrich

The arrival of the first to ask for help from Ukraine

Aschaffenburg, Irpigal: For the first time, the central residence for refugees in Aschaffenburg has become crowded. A bus arrives from the docking center in Geldersheim Photograph: Björn Friedrich

Photo: Bjorn Friedrich

The arrival of the first to ask for help from Ukraine

Aschaffenburg, Irpigal: For the first time, the central residence for refugees in Aschaffenburg has become crowded. A bus arrives from the docking center in Geldersheim Photograph: Björn Friedrich

Photo: Bjorn Friedrich

The arrival of the first to ask for help from Ukraine

Aschaffenburg, Irpigal: For the first time, the central residence for refugees in Aschaffenburg has become crowded. A bus arrives from the docking center in Geldersheim Photograph: Björn Friedrich

Photo: Bjorn Friedrich


If she could, she would imitate her life. Life lived in Ukraine. Good life, she says. The one with the plans. For example, having a third child. But copying does not work. Because Goldbach is not their home. The war is still raging in their homeland. Katya H. (34 years old) fled with her children and mother.


Her husband remained in Ukraine and actually went to the Aschaffenburg region three times to collect aid before returning to the war. At least for the kids, says Katya H., something like everyday life is back. They go to school and meet with their peers. She is looking for a job on her own. She is grateful to the Germans who welcomed her so cordially. But I dream of returning to Ukraine. Ukraine without war.

dreams without war

Alina (20 years old), a pregnant woman who fled to Germany with her mother, pursues completely different dreams. It is a dream of being able to stay in Aschaffenburg. like before. At the age of 12, she and her parents fled to Germany and were returned to Ukraine three years later. They are now back here again, and their father has not crossed the border. But: Germany is Alina’s home. Even more now. Because on May 12, she gave birth to her first son here. Fortunately, they are both okay, it was a complicated pregnancy. Mother, son and grandmother now live in their own apartment. They don’t want to go back.

Justin, Joshua, Chica, Irina and Jessica Mbaye (from left): The family that was deported to Ukraine at the end of November is counting on help from Heibach. Archive photo: Bollinger

Photo: Melanie Bollinger

The Mbaye family wants to stay, too. Haibach Mayor Andreas Zinglin (CSU) confirmed in the conversation that the three parents “are doing really well here”. Meanwhile, Irina Mbayri’s mother also followed, but only her husband still lives in Ukraine. The family lives in a communal apartment, which thanks to numerous donations can be furnished “fantastically”. According to Zenglein, all five family members now have a fantasy certificate and are therefore allowed to stay for at least three years. Mberis’ lawyer is currently campaigning for a permanent right to remain. Zenglein is confident that this will work.

Work, housing and bureaucracy

Things have calmed down a bit, says Volker Jules (The Greens), the volunteer coordinator of Ukrainian aid at Cal. Instead, other problems arose. In addition to looking for work and some wanting to return to their homeland, the main issue is bureaucracy. There are also sometimes “initial problems in living together”.

Vera (back) fled Ukraine with her mother and children and found accommodation with Volker Jules (pictured) in Cal.

Photo: Petra Reith

This was confirmed by Christian Messerschmidt of Wenigumstadt (Großostheim), who specially housed some people. The family is now looking for something new because the children’s voice is too loud for the landlords. “At first, a lot of people definitely didn’t realize how long the war would last,” he says.

Robert Edinchink, founder of the Ukrainian Sonetschko Kinderheimhilfe Association, described it in a similar way. In the diaries on the club’s website, he calculated the times he should write “War does not know Sunday.” This has happened seventeen times so far. The situation in Zaporizhzhje, where the house is located, is very tense. There is bombing, but no tangible progress. “Everyone agreed, including the district youth welfare committee on Monday: The war will keep us busy for a long time. More people will come or stay for a long time.

Nurse Xenia from the Sonetschko Children’s Home in eastern Ukraine. She was able to use the donations to buy diapers and toiletries. Photo: Robert Edinchink

Photo: Robert Edinchink/Private

Weiler Castle in Bissenbach is currently home to 52 IDPs. “Things are going well for us,” says Lucas Grimm, who organizes the accommodations. ‘Most of them already have jobs’ Grimm is still fundraising for more room. “Unfortunately, the desire to donate has diminished somewhat,” he says.

private residence

Most of the central emergency shelters in the city and the region are closed, only the former forest school in Karlstein is available for people who do not know where to go. According to Mayor Jessica Euler (CSU), 380 Ukrainians currently live in the city in decentralized accommodation and hotels, and the others live in private apartments. In the meantime, there are “increasing demands for other accommodation options, because living conditions are often very cramped in the long run,” says Euler.

Waiting for refugees: The former forest school in Karlstein offers space for 150 people in nine converted classrooms. Photo: Thomas Minich

Photo: Thomas Minich

The district office notes that the number of private apartments offered for housing has decreased and requests a letter: Ukrainehilfe@Lra-ab.bayern.de or 06021/394-7010.

According to the district office, the current topic is the change from receiving social benefits for asylum at the district office to receiving benefits from the duty station. “Not all refugees have been able to make this change,” she says. The city also talks about “enormous bureaucratic effort” and is trying to make transitions “smooth gradually and with little effort for the beneficiaries”.

According to Euler, “there has been no concrete feedback or experience yet” regarding Ukrainians looking for work in the city. The district office reports that as of May 31, 1,080 bogus certificates have been issued. Ukrainians who do not have a residence permit need one in order to be able to go to work.

Background: numbers

A total of 962 people from Ukraine have been registered in Aschaffenburg since February 24. According to information received from the city council, in the meantime 132 people have left the city.
According to the district office, about 2,000 displaced people are currently housed in the district, and 75 people are currently using the Karlstein Forest School. (eml)


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