We know a lot more about the CIV competitor than the trailer reveals



What did civilization actually do? For years, no other game has dared come close to CIV, and now in no time at all we’re seeing a developer studio after developers revolt against the king of historical turn-based strategy.

Is the king very old now? Has civilization made a lot of blunders in the last few cycles? Is it time to place a new bet? Maybe a little bit of everything. But whatever the reasons, we as players can only benefit from it.

After all, the last two main rivals, the ancient world and the human race, were both very entertaining 4X strategy games which, in their very own way, copied the principle of civilization and developed completely new ideas. The ancient world brought a glimpse of Crusader kings into the mix, while humanity completely rethought battles and cultural evolution.

The question now remains: What does Ara bring: the untold history with him? This all-new competitor CIV was first revealed at Microsoft’s big show in June 2022 and is due for release in 2023. The trailer shown has remained surprisingly mysterious.

Ara: History Untold is the next major competitor to post-human civilization






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Ara: History Untold is the next major competitor to post-human civilization

Fortunately, there is a lot of information on the web about this new contender for the throne of civilization – which we have compiled and analyzed for you.

Who is actually behind Ara?

Ara is developed by American development studio Oxide Games, based in Maryland. Studio you probably haven’t heard much about. In fact, it is not surprising that this particular developer is now trying to compete with Civilization.

Oxide Games was only founded in 2013 by employees who were previously at Electronic Arts especially Firaxis Games. These are the people who actually worked on civilization themselves! Now they are apparently trying to fully implement their own vision.

However, Oxide Games has only released one strategy game so far. In 2016, this studio launched the realistic strategy game Ashes of the Singularity. A sci-fi RTS in the style of Commander in Chief at the time wasn’t really great, but at least it was a solid first try.

As a historical global strategy game, Ara cannot do without the wonders of the world.






As a historical global strategy game, Ara cannot do without the wonders of the world.

Which game will be Ara?

As mentioned earlier, Ara: History Untold will be an impeccable 4X strategy game in which we will lead a nation through human history in turn. In doing so, we pass through different eras and, in addition to expanding our territory, we also have to be careful not to be left behind in technology.

Anyone who relies too much on controlling every battlefield with superior longbowmen will look dumb at some point. At the latest when stocks simply bounce off the steel plates of a modern tank. However, the progress is also changing the shape of the cities and the entire infrastructure of the empire. At least that’s what we suspect, because Ara shows off a lot of what we’ve come to expect in Civilization in the first screenshots. A look at the HUD provides the most information.

Technologies

In the upper right we clearly see that, as is usual in the genre, we select different techniques, which are then searched for in a certain number of turns. Here’s the first good news: At Ara, beer brewing appears to be its own technology. And the person here seems to be playing with Germany, at least the coat of arms at the bottom right is reminiscent of the Federal Eagle. Beer and Germany – well, that’s convenient.

ages

As usual, it seems that the game is also divided into different eras, which we can see in the lower right next to the button for the next movement. The exact number we walk in is still unclear, but there are certainly antiquity, the Iron Age, and the Atomic Age. Which seems a little strange, because the Iron Age in the strict sense of the word includes antiquity.

Sources

A number of resources can be seen in the right bar at the top of the screen. Interestingly, tokens for individual resources change with age and new ones are added. There is definitely a total population, as well as quest points, food, money, wood, and stone. Electricity will come later. The different codes can also indicate that the codes are still in the works and the numerical values ​​concreted here are meaningless (130,000 people in the Iron Age, 473 in the Atomic Age) is also most likely due to the game version.

There is a lot to see in this screenshot.  We learn about the first units as swordsmen, light cavalry, and catapult.  We also get an idea of ​​how to divide the zones into small sectors.  Apparently, Ara also works with the living.  Famous landmarks can also be seen.






There is a lot to see in this screenshot. We learn about the first units as swordsmen, light cavalry, and catapult. We also get an idea of ​​how to divide the zones into small sectors. Apparently, Ara also works with the living. Famous landmarks can also be seen.

What makes Ara special?

At the moment, it is still very difficult to crystallize exactly what distinguishes Ara from historical turn-based strategy games. At first glance, everything looks very familiar here. We know at least that Ara has his own approach when it comes to the question of who is the leader of the nation.

Here Ara places herself between civilization and humanity. There are certainly well-established leaders who are always portrayed as great personalities. For example, Nefertiti rules Egypt, Sappho rules Greece, and George Washington rules the United States. At the same time, Ara also allows us to create our own leader.

Ara never tires of emphasizing that we must explore a vibrant and dynamic world. For now, it still looks a lot like an ad phrase, at least there’s no concrete evidence of what it means. Anyway, the land and its biomes are sure to be randomly generated every time you start the game, but that’s the standard type.

The Ara map is designed in a very realistic style, this image almost looks like a miniature building.






The Ara map is designed in a very realistic style, this image almost looks like a miniature building.

What’s even more interesting is to say that our choices influence the stories of each of our subjects and that all people have their own unique story. It seems that Ara cares much more about the lives of people in our country. This is also reflected in the game’s graphics, as the streets look more lively as they are inhabited by young men and women.

In the end, Ara is said to have no clear path to victory. Apparently, the strategy game dispenses with the various conditions of victory that exist in civilization. Instead, we’re supposed to achieve victory in a completely different way each round. However, there is no specific information about this yet.

Humanity has already tried to break up the game on terms of victory – but this is one of the biggest weaknesses of the CIV competitor. Perhaps Ara will find a more creative way!

What do you think of Ara so far? Do you like what you see or are you rather skeptical? Write us your opinion in the comments!

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