DFB-Elf in individual review: Hoffmann could have been the champion – sport

There have not been four consecutive draws in the history of the German national football team. The following players took part in the 1-1 draw against Hungary in Budapest:

Manuel Neuer

(Photo: Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images)

Hansi Flick dismissed a reporter’s cautious inquiry into whether a change in goal could be conceivable by viewing European Cup champion Kevin Trapp as a mind-blind game. With a number of world-class saves, Neuer has recently shown he’s still at the height of his skills, but the first tackle in Budapest isn’t good evidence of his uniqueness: Like the rest of the German cover, he was surprised and defended himself with a slither header not optimally – forward rather than the side. He hit his target instantly. However, Neuer then answered the heretical questions aptly with unobtrusive performances and powerful tackles. Before the break, he saved the draw in the style of Vladislav Tretjak – like a great ice hockey goalkeeper, he stopped the game device with an ice sled that was revealed at lightning speed.

Thelo Kahrer

DFB-Elf in individual review: Not specified
(Photo: Laszlo Szirtesi/Getty Images)

The preferred student of the national coach. He took the position from Lucas Klostermann on the right, and, as is often the case, it was not immediately clear which of the arguments, apart from his variety, spoke in Kehrer’s favour. He took his position and focused on the hidden work and achieving his primary mission. Reluctant to constructive scrolling game and always unreliable. With his back pass to Neuer in the 72nd minute, he almost left his supporting role – the Hungarians gently left him.

Niklas Soleil

DFB-Elf in individual review: Not specified
(Photo: Matthias Koch/Imago)

Test the resilience of the relationship with future clubmate Schlutterbeek by sending him a killer pass – but this time in the poisoned substitute (#36). This was the only drastic gaffe, but the moment was not entirely atypical for the performance. She seemed unfocused at times, even if a little absent. He is jointly responsible for the sometimes large gaps in German coverage, especially in the last leg of the match.

Nico Schlutterbeek

DFB-Elf in individual review: Not specified
(Photo: Marton Munos/Reuters)

He earned a valuable scorer point when he helped Jonas Hoffmann equalize. One of his strengths showed his awareness of offensive capabilities. He also attracted attention in other respects with his aggressiveness and courage, which was appreciated by all. One or the other of his bad passes in the forward movement is also part of his standard program. Excellent innocence after the tactical error as a result of Sule’s bad pass, but he could not stop the yellow card with it.

David Raum

DFB-Elf in individual review: Not specified
(Photo: Alex Grimm/Getty Images)

He always resumes where he left off against England. As a one-man forward company on the left, you look for the opposite baseline and every opportunity to play the cross. However, defensively, he initially required more than he would like in his offensive motives.

Joshua Kimmish

DFB-Elf in individual review: Not specified
(Photo: Marton Munos/Reuters)

As a room and game manager in the main office, he performed his duties with loyalty and mostly tact. However, he was sufficiently occupied with these tasks and was rarely able to realize his other competencies as a deciding factor in the middle of the action, and thus his influence on game design was limited.

Leon Goretzka

DFB-Elf in individual review: Not specified
(Photo: Anna Szilagyi/AP)

Presumably due to his small gesture of heart at the Munich EM meeting with Hungary, he could not expect a warm welcome from the Hungarian fans. Turns out this was a popular duck. That might be fine with Goretzka. It should have been less for him that the game didn’t interest him relatively. He tried to play seriously, ran passionately between the penalty areas, but did not take on any formative significance. It made sense that he had to clear the field for Ilkay Gundogan.

Jonas Hoffmann

DFB-Elf in individual review: Scoring against England: Jonas Hoffmann of Gladbach.

Score against England: Jonas Hoffmann from Gladbach.

(Photo: Marton Munos/Reuters)

His reappointment is evidence of his growing profile in the national team. Already the most dangerous German striker against England, this time he was also the golden goal man. He knows how to create space at the crucial moment with his skillful passes, but the Hungarian goalkeeper Gulassi helped him with an equaliser error. Hoffmann could have been the hero of the evening if he had completed the individual effort with a shot on target in the 72nd minute – instead playing selflessly against Werner and thus missing Germany’s best chance of the match.

Kai Havertz

DFB-Elf in individual review: Not specified
(Photo: Alex Grimm/Getty Images)

In the position of Thomas Muller in the main role, he was received by a disciplined and well-versed Hungarian goalkeeper. On his 23rd birthday, sorry for the constant resemblance, the hosts gave him no gifts, and Havertz had to work hard in every scene, it was nothing but a happy game for him. As in the previous missions, no one wanted to blame him for his performance, but this time it wasn’t enough to offer big compliments either. He still had a precious moment when he netted Hoffman in the 72nd minute, but was denied the well-deserved scorer point.

Jamal Musila

DFB-Elf in individual review: Not specified
(Photo: Laszlo Szirtesi/Getty Images)

In fact, he’s so good at not playing all the time, Julian Nagelsmann comforts Musiala in Munich when the coach can’t find a place for the best talent. Hansi Flick knows the problem, but this time he answered it firmly by favoring Musiala over the weak Leroy Sané. The 19-year-old from Munich proved to be a competitive solution once again, spending his usual moments taking the ball out and not returning it despite a group of opposing defenders rushing to him. Oftentimes, however, it got stuck in battle during these single forays and then recovered to its original state with a back-and-forth pass.

Timo Werner

DFB-Elf in individual review: Not specified
(Photo: Bernadette Szabo/Reuters)

Recipients of a special support program started by Hansi Flick, which focuses on Timo Werner. He got the favorite central senior job, but again he couldn’t get past the well-known reservations there. His speed advantage had no effect as he kept starting early and was already offside when the ball came. But he was hardworking – certainly a pressure factor for the Hungarian defense, and Werner scored a few corners. But when it came to doing the right thing instinctively, he often did the wrong thing instinctively – as in the perfect scene after Musiyala’s pass when he dodged and failed instead of using a well-positioned Havertz (54th place).

Ilkay Gundogan

DFB-Elf in individual review: Not specified
(Photo: Matthias Koch/Imago)

I got into trouble when I took Goretzka’s place. Gündogan was no longer able to loosen the fixed structure.

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