Because of rising energy costs: swimming pools are getting colder – domestic policy

Pepper alarm in our pools – only in the summer!

According to the Pool Association, 60 percent of 6,000 public pools (both outdoor and indoor pools) have lowered the pool’s water temperature so far. the reason: The skyrocketing price of gas and oil!

Christian Mankel, the German Bathing Association (DGfdB), told BILD that this happened “all over the republic”. The association recommends: Cut down two notches for energy savings of up to 25 percent!

▶ ︎ Usually, the average temperature in German swimming pools is between 23 and 27 degrees in the swimmers area outside and 25 to 27 degrees indoors. The temperature of non-swimming areas is usually around 31 ° C, children’s pools and therapeutic pools are heated to 32 ° C.

Dramatic: The Pool Association advises pools to close off heated outdoor pools. Therapy pools should also be drained – those who suffer from rheumatism and people with disabilities will be affected. The only exception: children’s pools, according to the association’s recommendation, should not be less than 32 degrees.

However, uncomfortable procedures were not recommended without reason.

For Mankell, it was intimidating how once again the pools were so carelessly placed at the forefront of lockdown discussions due to rising energy costs. “The situation is forcing us to create energy concepts to reduce costs,” explains Gerd Landsberg, 69, director general of the Association of Cities and Municipalities, at BILD. This is done mainly through the main bearers of costs: office buildings and bathrooms.”

To this end, DGfdB has published eight-point guidelines for swimming pools, which include closing outdoor pools and slides and lowering the water temperature.


Criticism of pepper temperatures is particularly relevant to children's swimming coursesFoto: Nicolas Armer/dpa

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Criticism of pepper temperatures is particularly relevant to children’s swimming coursesPhoto: Nicholas Armer/D

Francesca Grallmann, a spokeswoman for Cologne Baths GmbH, says the temperature of the indoor pools leading to the outdoors in Cologne has dropped by 3 degrees. No procedures are necessary in outdoor pools due to “solar radiation”. With a clear conscience, whirlpools and heated pools can be heated less on hot days.

▶ In Berlin’s summer pools, the water is heated to 22 to 23 degrees instead of 26 degrees in 2021.

︎ Hessan baths cool off, too—the country is the one with the savings when it comes to energy: The Lan-dale issue made headlines nationwide, clogging warm water in all schools and gyms.

▶ ︎ Already at the beginning of April, the water temperature on warm bathing days in Recklinghausen was lowered by one degree (29 instead of 30), with the onset of the outdoor pool season, the warm bathing day was generally omitted. In two outdoor pools, the city also lowered the pool temperature by one degree – from 24 to 23 degrees.

But there are also criticisms of tiger water! Low temperatures for children’s swimming courses are “a disaster,” says Michael Ulmer (67), athletic director at the “Erster Frankfurter Schwimmclub von 1891 e. v.”

30 degrees is perfect. “Even under 28 degrees, kids start shivering, get blue lips and don’t enjoy learning to swim. That would be completely counterproductive — especially now that we can start again after Corona and we’re virtually out of it,” Olmer says. .”

Example: Nika (6) is doing a DLRG swim. Her mother says, “Last time my daughter came to me in the middle of the road because she was so cold.”

Those who treat people who work in therapy pools are also critical of the cold water. People who find it difficult to move their limbs can do so in the water. “Moving there is less painful,” says physical therapist Elizabeth Sella. “Activity is very important for health and relaxation which is why exercise therapy in water has such a great therapeutic effect. But you can’t do all that in a 19-degree pool, it’s too cold.”

‘Mostly Big Understanding’ Among Bathers – But Not Everyone Is Happy With Forced Cooling

According to the director of the Mankell Bathing Association, most swimmers approach forced cooling in an athletic way. There is “mostly great understanding”.

But there are also many critical voices: “Of course not everyone is happy with the cooler temperatures,” swimming champion Verena Metvissel (32) tells BILD. “When we had only 5 degrees at night last week, the water was only about 20 degrees the next day. Regular guests came to us – they didn’t specifically complain, but asked questions. Then you can swim in only 8 lanes instead of 20. But They’re still coming.”

Pool regular Bettina Hirsch, 64, says, “If the water was two degrees warmer, that would have been fine. I can still swim, but I’m in the water for much less time. Otherwise, you won’t feel warm at all afterwards.”

“It’s too cold for me,” retired Andrea Goerlitz, 73, from Dresden, says the new water temperature is too cold for her. “I like the warmth and don’t turn the temperature down in the apartment either.”


Felix (47) goes swimming with his daughter every Wednesday.  Says: Foto: Ufuk Ucta

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Felix (47) goes swimming with his daughter every Wednesday. “The water has become noticeably cooler,” he says.Photo: Ufuk Ucta

Felix (47), an engineer from Berlin, goes swimming with his daughter every Wednesday. “The water has gotten noticeably cooler,” he tells BILD. “But I have a lot of understanding for that. When millions suffer the consequences of war, I can muster this solidarity. I can also accept eight more degrees!”

Beate Funke (50), a logistician from Dresden, prefers warm water, and says, “For me, that’s also part of relaxing in the shower.”


Isabella, 24, says she can handle cold water on her own, but finds: Foto: Ufuk Ucta

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Isabella, 24, says she can handle the cold water on her own, but finds: “It’s too cold for the kids and the elderly.”Photo: Ufuk Ucta

“The water must be six degrees colder! I was completely shivering at first – then just jumped in,” says Isabella, 24, from Berlin. Even lakes are warmer. I go swimming every day and I can stand it, but it’s too cold for kids and old people.”

Emil (19) from Berlin also had to get used to the cold water. “If you don’t get out right away, that’s okay. But the kids should learn to swim in water that’s warm enough for them,” he says.

Teacher Mark Newman, 44, goes to the pool two to four times a week to rehearse. “I’ve already noticed that it’s colder than it has been in the past few days,” he says. “I think it’s a good thing, and it makes sense. We have to save on energy costs. Everyone has to do their part.”


Steffen Thiele, 59, did not notice the temperature differenceFoto: Picxell

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Steffen Thiele, 59, did not notice the temperature differencePhoto: Picxell

Stephen Thiel (59), a sports teacher at the vocational school from Dresden, did not notice the temperature difference. “It’s only about a degree,” he says. “I think we’re a bit spoiled in our lives.”

Dr. Kristen Knus, 55, still gets the chills when she gets out of the pool: “I shiver when I’m swimming, I can’t stay in the water as long as I’m used to it. I come here often. But I realize the need. It’s always been heated pools.” Outdoor swimming is an environmental sin. The water temperature of 3 degrees is the sacrifice we have to make.”

Opinions differ between the couple, Maria (75) and Peter Ellinger (79). Peter Ellinger can only stay in the water for half an hour. “My wife sometimes stays there for two hours,” he says. Cold water doesn’t bother her: “If you take a cold shower beforehand, that’s fine. We also want gas heating in the winter, so we have to do without a few degrees now. What Putin offers us is horrible.”

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