New CDs with leaders Francois Xavier Roth and Rene Jacobs – Culture

Gould is a killer, but the way he sings to his dying wife – Melisande is one of his victims – is painfully beautiful. Alexandre Duhamel’s dark voice rises tenderly and almost without tone, blending self-pity with deep emotion: this moment is one of the great opera scenes, happily captured in a new recording. The conductor of Claude Debussy’s “Pelléas et Mélisande” is called François-Xavier Roth, the man is one of the great and distinguished musicians. He conducts opera in Cologne, but with his ensemble “Les Siècles” he is also an instrumental troupe since composing the compositions. Many of the instruments used in the “Pelléas” were built around 1900, and tendonitis is undoubtedly a natural thing. Instruments help approach this floating, dying music, which Ruth also imparts a crisp, dark acoustic sound, which stimulates him from lively to very dramatic. The orchestra of “Les siècles” is as present as the singers, acting as a messenger of death in this wearisome civilisational dance of death. (Harmonia Mundi)

Jazz, rhythm and folklore are often indispensable components of Maurice Ravel, and also for his piano pieces, which are very different but composed at the same time, a light three-step movement, as well as a wild dance entry in the middle unwinding itself from the shallow “loop”. to Richard Wagner; The pianist is only allowed to use his left hand on this ghost, which nonetheless allows for insane dexterity. Once again, François-Xavier Roth leads his magnificent collection “Les Siècles”, as if the sound evokes the alluring aromas of a warm Mediterranean night. Pianist Cedric Tiberjian perfectly fits into this idea, it is present without control. The two concerts together are only 40 minutes long, so there’s more space on the CD. Stéphane Degout offers lyrical contrasts, songs by Ravel, Don Quixote’s love songs to Dulcinée, but also poems by Stéphane Mallarmé. Everything floats, everything is tenderness and seduction. (Harmonia Mundi)

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“I am a bird of paradise,” the mystic Rumi wrote 800 years ago, “I do not belong to the earthly world, though I have been imprisoned in flesh and bones for a few days.” Rumi fled the attacking Mongols from his hometown of Khorasan in eastern Persia, first to Damascus, then to Konya in central Anatolia, and was a popular teacher. The meeting with the dervish Shams of Tabrizi, who shattered his existence, made him one of the greatest mystics, similar to Hafez, Juan de la Cruz, Teresa of Avila or Ibn Arabi. Rumi learned from him in Damascus, and he knew the legendary “interpreter of desires,” a small poetic cycle describing a mystical experience of God through love. Rumi builds on this with over 100,000 verses in Persian and sometimes Arabic, mostly inspired by the dervish sun. Kia Tabsian came to Quebec from Persia as a teenager, played the three-stringed lute, and composed and recorded a collection of Rumi’s poems with singer Ghalia Benali. With Benali, the voice of the verses alone shines through in a seductive, dreamlike way. Tabassian and his band “Constantinople” present a modern mystical tonal language that perfectly fits into the Persian musical tradition, which effortlessly asserts that Rumi is a bird of paradise. (“In the Footsteps of Rumi”, seated)

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“Der Freischütz” by Carl Maria Weber captivates with catchy and at the same time disturbing rhythms, because here more than in most other operas, it is about social upheaval, on the question of how to better shape life. So the play mixes eternal evil and innocence, superstition, and functional reasoning with humanity. This shows that the new social order finally raises doubts and questions again: the human race will never experience the ideal society. Conductor and former instrumentalist Rene Jacobs exacerbates this struggle for a better society in his lavish new recording, designed as a radio play. He composed the opening scene, which Weber did not set to music, with the help of “Freischütz” motifs. This reinforces the element of Christian goodness and increases the drama and disorder factor in the piece. In Jacobs’ “Freischütz” there is a battle of good against evil from the beginning, which is not yet resolved to the end, and the final delight is only partly an affirmation and not a real victory. (Harmonia Mundi)

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