Classic Column – Culture – SZ.de

French composer Cesar Franck He is mainly known for his organ works, the master sonata for violin and piano and his piano piece “Prélude, choral et fugue”. The French Romantic Music Center in Palazzetto Bru Zane is now presenting an amazing event on the composer’s 100th birthday Record all songs Outside, they are real gems. Establishment Christoyannis delves deeply into this romantic, over-expressive gem with its warm, colorful, and easy-going baritone, but avoids any hint of emotion or mannerisms. The same goes for the Véronique Gens, whose translucent, diamond-sparkling soprano’s bell blends beautifully with the bell-free sequences of the piano part of early romance “S’il est un charming gazon,” based on a text by Victor Hugo, to which Jeff Cohen treats with great sympathy. In “Sechs Duetten,” composed in 1888, two years before Frank’s death, the voices of Jens and Christoyannis intertwine in the most passionate way: the sublime, cultured art of song. (Prozan)

One of the central and yet terrifying acts of the twentieth century has acquired a terrible new subject matter in the past two months. Olivier Messian “Quatour pour la fin du temps”It was composed and first performed in 1941 in a German prisoner-of-war camp at Görlitz, where Messian was interned. His musical vision of the end of time, which in eight motions seems to disintegrate all earthly systems of time, meter, and space, is in fact carried by a deep Catholic certainty of salvation, who turned all his works into “works of faith”, as the deeply religious Messiah once said. However, many quiet, gentle interpretations omit the character of Messianic music, especially in this work. In every song of the heavenly messengers, despite angelic voices and praise The recurring tone of Jesus, it rests on the tone of despair and the bitter sadness of the bitter farewell.From his daughter, violinist Leah Houseman, with crystal clarity and gestural rhetoric essential solemnity.The effect increases at the end, as the music approaches the end with “Praise of the immortality of Jesus”, the tone of the violin spins tenderly And she sings on piano strings, soaring to infinite heights.(Ave)

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Das wins with his massive complete record of Brahms quarts Balcia Quartet One of the most prestigious Diapason d’or Awards in 2016. Now it’s over with the violinist Tabia Zimmermann the cellist Jean Joyen Quiras collaborated between the two hexagons series Register with who Johannes Brahms In 1862 and 1866, a good ten years before the first quartet, he had approached the royal genre of chamber music, which had been the overwhelming role model for Beethoven. Together, the six musicians play along with similar artistic mindedness as they walk, as if they’ve been composing music together regularly for years. The sheer range of expression that Brahms unlocks in these pieces is brought to life in a radical and at the same time highly differentiated way. Musicians sing the great melody thrill of the first movement of the first hexagram with breathtaking warmth and amazing harmony. The second movement enters a completely different world of sound with its sudden, unshakeable ancient stringed sound. The metric peculiarities of the scherzo drive music with musical stubbornness into chaos with enjoyment. The full unit tone of the Poco adagio from the second hexagram is seldom heard so pale and melted. (alpha)

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pianist German Helmut Formed by generations of singers as companions to the song, it is appreciated today by such stars as Diana Damrau and Jonas Kaufman. With the latter, he recently recorded an entire album of Franz Liszt songs. Now the soprano, who had experience in the opera repertoire, admits Sarah TruebellWorking with Helmut Deutsch “changed her life”. With a distinctly lyrical soprano, she performs the five Liszt songs from Kaufman’s concert, which she sings on her debut album art, “In meine Lied,” with great care and grace, albeit with a very cautious touch. However, she has moved away from Mahler’s song by Ruckert Leader and Richard Strauss’ “The Last Four” song. Its soprano simply lacks the depth, size, and abyss of this repertoire. (Apartments)

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