What can and can do satire in times of war? | NDR.de

As of 04/28/2022 6:31 PM

Satire and political satire in particular are permitted. But especially in times of war, when many people do not necessarily feel laughter, the question arises: How can and should sarcasm deal with such difficult topics?

by Anina Pomerinki

There are even events that even veteran satirists like Stefan Fritsch of the satirical magazine NDR Info “Intensivstation” took with them: September 11, the attack on “Charlie Hebdo” magazine or the war in Ukraine: “First you stand by yourself and look: What are we actually doing now? Satire It’s often an event in addition to time, and you have to let a few things sink in. We put ourselves in order, waited and asked ourselves: What is going on now and when is something going to come again?”

However, for him, humor is one of the best coping strategies – especially in times of crisis: “In all the misery and all the drama, you still find pictures where you think: That should be shredded now. And that’s how we met Together at first and then closer.”

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What actually distinguishes political satire? She was allowed to express sarcasm and malice, of course, she was allowed to express really right; But can she do everything? more

Sarah Bosetti: “Satire is a great art form”

Fritz finds that all forms of orthography are appropriate. Spelling is allowed to do everything! But she doesn’t always have to do everything! Satirist Sarah Bosetti is currently dealing with exactly this topic on ZDF: “When a racist is in a wheelchair, I’m the first to make a joke about him. But not about his inability to walk, but about his racism. Satire is a wonderful art form. Comedy is good. Sometimes. And there is no excuse for not being responsible for your own words. We live in a social climate where comedy or political cabaret does not mix well with audiences of millions and irresponsibility. If you want to make jokes about Jews, or about women, or about Blacks – that can be good. It depends on what you want to achieve with that.”

Matthias Broadway: “There is a new danger”

Hanoverian cabaret artist Matthias Broadway was also on stage shortly after the outbreak of the war with a bad feeling: “I know that people have seen the news that they are moved and afraid. I know that it is unusual for them to go to a nightclub only because they have tickets. I could understand Lots of people who would have stayed home.” On the other hand, I was grateful, and said that onstage at the beginning—as a prelude, without any form of humor—I think it’s important to set culture against any form of non-culture.”

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Matthias Broadway © picture alliance / SvenSimon Photo: Malte Ossowski

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“There’s a new seriousness and a new sense of responsibility,” Broadway says of the cabaret scene. 8 minutes

In his opinion, the landscape has changed – especially as a result of the Corona epidemic: “There is a new seriousness and a new sense of responsibility. You no longer hit them there, but look at what is right or necessary now and where you may have to stand behind the government’s actions. I have never experienced this before in Nightclub “.

The cabaret should be humane

Brodowy doesn’t mind this development – as long as the cabaret still deals with enough silly topics. For him, cabaret remains humane: “I think it is much more interesting to question attitudes, to subject social trends to criticism. (…) I still have this understanding of democracy that we all have this country is. So we all have to expose ourselves to criticism. who performs cabaret on stage.

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Culture NDR | The magazine | 04/28/2022 | 4 pm

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