Unbelievable But True: The 13 Best True Crime Documentaries on Netflix

Netflix introduces new products at an incredible speed, which is why it is becoming increasingly difficult to see them through the jungle of series and movies. The following 13 true crime headlines definitely deserve a second look.




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Interaction between the judiciary and the media.

Against the backdrop of the modern media landscape in the United States, court proceedings are increasingly becoming a form of entertainment: television broadcasting has given new meaning to creative presentation and public visibility. Public opinion about guilt or innocence is increasingly influenced by the press before, during, and after trial.

The documentary “Trials in the Media” deals with cases from a variety of legal fields and presents, among other things, insights into the murder trial of “Jenny Jones Show” (Warner Bros.), whose director is said to have triggered a murderous act or the case of Amado’s murder. Diallo, an unarmed African-American immigrant was killed 41 times by four police officers in New York City.

Worth watching because: “Court proceedings in the media” revolve around a legal-political structure and raise the question whether the media, especially the popular press, do not really play the role of the judiciary and are therefore able to have a say in the outcome of court proceedings.

6 episodes of about 60 minutes each

to the trailer




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How a pizza delivery man gets killed in front of everyone.

On August 28, 2003, pizza delivery man Brian Wells walked into a bank in Erie, Pennsylvania and left a note on the counter asking for a quarter of a million dollars. This is the first task he has to complete within a certain amount of time – powered by a bomb he wears around his neck.

The bomb disposal squad called by the police was delayed due to traffic jams. The bomb and its carrier exploded in front of the public. A scene that will burn in your memory. A cat-and-mouse game between lawbreakers and the FBI begins, until a former beauty in town is arrested.

Worth watching for the following reasons: evil genius Fifteen years after the pizza launcher heist proves there are more plots and murders than ever thought.

4 episodes of about 50 minutes each

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The arbitrary death of an eight-year-old child sparks calls for justice in California.

Because of the weak system, it was not possible to protect an eight-year-old, although there were many warning signs and signs of his threat: Gabriel Fernandez died in 2013 as a result of cruel and long-term abuse by his mother and boyfriend. Coming from a similar background, attorney Jonathan Hatami takes the case of Gabriel Fernandez and is on the front lines of the struggle for justice and accountability in Los Angeles County.

Worth watching for the following reasons: Award-winning documentary filmmaker Brian Knappenberger It reveals the weaknesses of the system through its recordings and thus begins a wake-up call to society for a critical rethinking of existing structures.

6 episodes of approximately 55 minutes each

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A killer obsessed with fame breaks one of the most important rules of the Internet.

When a video emerged showing an unknown man killing two drops, the internet went viral. A group of amateur detectives unite on the Internet to track down the culprit – a hunt is underway all over the world. But the dangerous game of cat and mouse motivates the abuser to publish increasingly disturbing videos. Until he finally shared the last video on the Internet, in which a person becomes a victim.

Worth watching for the following reasons: The documentary has a lot to say about hypothetical behavior and mutual influences: How much blame do amateur investigators ultimately bear in the escalation?

3 episodes of about 60 minutes each

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A nun is murdered – but no one is held accountable.

Sister Kathy Cesnik, a famous nun and Catholic high school teacher, disappeared in November 1969. About two months later, her body was found in Baltimore. However, the circumstances of her death have not yet been revealed. When a former sister-sister student publicly announced allegations of sexual abuse by a school chaplain in the 1990s, the case received renewed media attention. But despite the statements of various victims and witnesses, no one has been held accountable to this day.

Worth watching for the following reasons: The documentary, In Search of the Truth, goes beyond the death of Sister Kathy Cesnik and explores issues such as sexual abuse of clergy and the actions of governments and religious bodies to blame the director for these crimes. Ryan White Accordingly, at worst, they are said to have deliberately covered it up.

7 episodes of about 60 minutes each

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A reassessment of the unsolved death of the self-proclaimed street queen of New York’s gay ghetto scene.

Marsha B Johnson was an icon of the gay right-wing movement in the 1960s and co-founded Trasvestites Action Revolutionaries with Silvia Rivera. When Johnson’s body was found in the Hudson River in 1992, police dismissed the death as a suicide and failed to conduct further investigations. Nearly 25 years later, American activist Victoria Cruz attempted to reopen the case to summarize the death and find out what really happened.

Worth watching for the following reasons: “The Death and Life of Marsha B. Johnson” brings viewers closer to two main characters in the gay liberation and the 1969 riots that followed police violence at the Stonewall tape. A wonderful and tragic leap into the past.

105 minute movie

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Crime writer Michael Peterson is facing trial for the murder of his wife.

When, on the evening of December 9, 2001, a distraught clerk called the local 911 in Durham, Northern California, to report that his wife, Kathleen, had fallen from the stairs and seriously injured herself, no one realized the accident was turning into a day that would turn years from litigation.

Worth watching for the following reasons: The documentary accompanies the defense team during the trial, allowing viewers to experience the captivating story of crime writer Michael Peterson up close.

13 episodes of about 55 minutes each

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An innocent convict becomes the prime suspect in a new crime.

Convicted wrongdoer Stephen fights for his innocence for years until DNA results prove it and he is released from prison. From now on, he does everything in his power to expose the alleged corruption of the local law enforcement agency – until he unexpectedly becomes the prime suspect in a new horrific murder case.

Worth watching for the following reasons: The making of a killer is a true life story. The series offers an insight into a controversial situation where reputation is everything and appearances are always deceiving.

10 episodes of about 60 minutes each

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The supposed fate of a 16-year-old murderer receives a fresh coat of paint.

In 2004, 16-year-old Cynthia Denise Brown was arrested in Nashville, Tennessee and sentenced to life in prison under the adult criminal code for the murder of a 43-year-old man who attempted to use her sexual services. After nearly 10 years of legal ordeals, the governor granted her clemency petition in 2019, as opinions on juvenile verdicts have changed over the years and Cyntoia has been a good prisoner as a prisoner.

Worth watching for the following reasons: “Cyntoia Brown: The Story of a Pardoned Killer” sheds light on complex and ancient structures marked by disproportion and violence against women.

The movie is 97 minutes long

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11 Years Innocent to Death: The Ron Williamson Story.

Going to prison is not that difficult. However, letting him go again is almost impossible. One of our greatest fears—that he might be imprisoned innocently—was caught up with Ron Williamson: a baseball prodigy was once convicted of a murder he didn’t commit in the ’80s and has spent 11 years on death row ever since.

Worth watching for the following reasons: Based on John Grisham’s novel of the same name, the documentary series “Prisoner” brings to mind the true story of a wrongful conviction.

6 episodes of about 45 minutes each

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The past catches up with the athlete who seems to have achieved everything in life.

Aaron Hernandez quickly made his way up the ranks as a talented young footballer and was a member of the National Football League at the age of twenty. After signing a five-year, $40 million contract with the New England Patriots in 2013, his name is suddenly linked to horrific murders. What followed was the never-before-seen story of a violent and abused young man.

Worth watching for the following reasons: The three-part documentary features exclusive excerpts from the former athlete’s court hearing – including the individual factors that led to Hernandez’s trial, conviction and eventual death.

3 episodes of about 67 minutes each

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A documentary in which big cats appear less dangerous than their owners.

The short series takes viewers into the realm of predator fanatics: Joseph Maldonado, aka Joe Exotic, runs a private wild zoo in Oklahoma, where up to 100 tigers sometimes live. In addition to his questionable work with tiger cubs, his rival, alleged animal rights activist Carol Baskin, is the focus. She also owns a zoo and is also accused of feeding her ex-husband’s tigers.

Worth watching for the following reasons: The seven-part documentary with an extra episode tells the incredible story of private wild animal parks in the United States that couldn’t be more ridiculous.

8 episodes of about 45 minutes each

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Expose errors of justice that deprived the accused of the opportunity to achieve justice.

“Innocence Project – Justice for Justitia” tells the story behind eight miscarriages of justice. Divided into three animated blocks covering evidence, witnesses, and prosecution, the documentary exposes stark flaws in the American criminal justice system while showing how the lives of victims and their families have been shattered.

Worth watching for the following reasons: Netflix shows several hair-raising cases that have put innocent people behind bars through improper action by relevant state officials.

9 episodes of 51-85 minutes each

to the trailer

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